Publications: Dr. Maha Alsarheed
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Publications & Abstracts

  1. Nicholson JW and AlSarheed M.  Changes on storage of polyacid-modified composite resins.  Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 1998; 25(8): 616-20
  2. Bedi R and AlSarheed M.  Abstract on Ethnic variations amongst women choosing medical and dental schools.  Dental Research 1998: Special Issue Vol. 76.
  3. AlSarheed M, Bedi R, Hunt NP.  Abstract on Production and evaluation of tactile graphics version of IOTN for visually impaired patients.  Journal of Dental Research 2000: Special Issue Vol. 79.
  4. AlSarheed M, Bedi R, Hunt NP.  The development of a tactile graphic version of IOTN for visually impaired patients.  Journal of Clinical Orthodontics Research 2000; 3(3): 94-100. 
  5. Al-Sarheed M, Angeletou A, Ashley PF, Lucas VS, Whitehead B, Roberts GJ An investigation of the oral health status and reported oral care of children with heart and heart-lung transplant.  Int J Paediatr Dent 2000; 10: 298-305.
  6. Abstract on Special needs dentistry within dental curriculum.  Dental Research 2001: Special Issue Vol. 80. 
  7. AlSarheed M, Bedi R, Hunt NP.  Attitudes of dentists, working in Riyadh, towards people with a sensory impairment. Spec Care Dent 2001; 21 (3): 113-6.
  8. Al-Sarheed M, Bedi R, Hunt NP Orthodontic treatment need and self-perception of 11-16-year-old Saudi Arabian children with a sensory impairment attending special schools. J Orthod 2003 Mar; 30(1): 39-44. 
  9. AlSarheed M, Bedi R, Hunt NP.  Traumatised permanent teeth in 11-16-year-old Saudi Arabian children with a sensory impairment attending special schools. Dental Traumatolo, 2003; 3(19): 123-126.
  10. Al-Sarheed.  Abstract on The effect of a new adhesive on shear bond strengths of fissure sealants.  Dental Research 2003: Special Issue Vol. 81. 
  11. Al-Sarheed M, Bedi R, Hunt NP.  The views and attitudes of parents of children with a sensory impairment towards orthodontic care.  Eur J Orthod 2004; 26: 87-91.
  12. Al-Sarheed M.  Occupational exposure and hepatitis B vaccination statues in dental students in Central Saudi Arabia.  Saudi Med J 2004; 25(12): 1943-46.
  13. Maha Al-Sarheed.  Feeding habits of children with Down syndrome living in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.  J disability and Oral Health 2006; 7(1): 17-21.
  14. Al-Sarheed M.  Bond strength of 4 sealants using conventional etch and a self-etching primer. J Dent Child (Chic) 2006;73(1):37-41.
  15. Al-Sarheed MA.  Evaluation of shear bond strength and SEM observation of all-in-one self-etching primer used for bonding of fissure sealants. J Contemp Dent Pract .2006;7(2):9-16.
  16. Al-Malik MI, Al-Sarheed MA.  Comprehensive dental care of pediatric patients treated under general anesthesia in a hospital setting in Saudi Arabia. J Contemp Dent Pract. 2006; 7(1):79-88.
  17. AlSarheed M, Bedi R, Alkhatib MN, Hunt NP. Dentists' attitudes and practices toward provision of orthodontic treatment for children with visual and hearing impairments Spec Care Dentist. 2006; 26(1):30-6.
  18. M. AlSarheed. A comparative study of oral health amongst trisomy21 children living in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: Part 1 caries, malocclusion, trauma. The Saudi Dental Journal 2015; 27: 220–223
  19. M.A. AlSarheed. Comparative study of oral health among trisomy 21 children living in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: Part 2, gingival condition.. The Saudi Dental Journal 2015; 27: 224–227
  20. AlSarheed MA, Al-Sehaibany FS Combined orthodontic and periodontic treatment in a child with Papillon Lefèvre syndrome. Saudi Med J. 2015; 36(8):987-92.
  21. Sheta SA, Al-Sarheed MA, Abdelhalim AA Intranasal dexmedetomidine vs midazolam for premedication in children undergoing complete dental rehabilitation: a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Paediatr Anaesth. 2014; 24(2):181-9.
  22. Alsarheed MChildren's Perception of Their Dentists. Eur J Dent. 2011 Apr; 5(2):186-90.
  23. Sheta SA, Alsarheed M. Oral midazolam premedication for children undergoing general anaesthesia for dental care. Int J Pediatr.2009;2009:274380..

Abstracts

1. Al-Sarheed M.,

Bond Strength of 4 sealants using conventional etch and a self-etching primer. J Dent Child (Chic). 2006 Jan-Apr;73(1):37-41.
Department of Preventive Dentistry, Division of Pediatric Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. alsarheedm@yahoo.com

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the shear bond strength of 4 fissure sealant systems (Dyract Seal, Concise, Visio-Seal, Helioseal) to enamel using conventional etch and self-etching primer (Prompt-L-Pop). METHODS: Fifty-six newly extracted noncarious first permanent molars were used and embedded in a Teflon mold (3-mm height, 3-mm internal diameter). Mesial surfaces were exposed to a flattened area of enamel and then dried and washed. The teeth were divided into 8 groups, each consisting of 7 specimens stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 24 hours. Then specimens were tested in a shear mode (Instron) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The mean and standard deviations were subjected to an analysis of variance. RESULTS: The average bond strengths using Prompt-L-Pop were: (1) Dyract Seal=20.61 MPa; (2) Concise=23.42 MPa; (3) Visio-Seal=2.94 MPa; and (4) Helioseal=11.83 MPa. These values were higher than and statistically different from those of Dyract Seal (10.18 MPa) and Concise (9.17 MPa) when the conventional etch system was used (student t test, P<.001).

CONCLUSION: The bond strengths of Prompt-L-Pop, in conjunction with Dyract Seal and Concise fissure sealant materials, exceeded those of conventional etch.


2. AlSarheed M, Bedi R, Alkhatib MN, Hunt NP.

Dentists' attitudes and practices toward provision of orthodontic treatment for children with visual and hearing impairments. Spec Care Dentist. 2006 Jan-Feb;26(1):30-6.

The objective of this study was to determine differences in behavior and attitudes of dentists in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in providing orthodontic care for children who are sensory impaired. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to all dentists working in Riyadh to assess the following domains: personal characteristics of the dentists and their practices, provision of dental care for children who are visually-impaired (Vl) and/or hearing-impaired (HI), and their attitude toward providing orthodontic care for these children. Attitudes were measured on two scales and the overall score of these two scales represented each respondent's attitude. Thirty percent of the dentists provided dental care for children with VI and 45.3 percent did for children with HI. The provision of orthodontic care was significantly affected by the country in which the dentists had received their dental training, both for children with VI and HI (p < 0.01), and by number of years they had been in practice for children with VI (p < 0.05). Regression analysis showed that only the country of dental training significantly affected the dentist's attitude score. There were also significant variations in attitudes toward the provision of orthodontic treatment for children with sensory impairment (SI), influenced by dental training and experience. In practical terms, this means that improvement in attitudes needs to be initiated at the dental undergraduate level. Establishing global guidelines for the provision of orthodontic treatment for patients with sensory impairment is likely to assist both professionals and patients.


3. Al-Sarheed MA.

Evaluation of shear bond strength and SEM observation of all-in-one self-etching primer used for bonding of fissure sealants.
J Contemp Dent Pract. 2006 May 1;7(2):9-16.

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and compare enamel shear bond strength of an all-in-one self-etching primer (Prompt L-Pop) to regular acid etch material when bonded to two-fissure sealant systems (Concise and Dyract Seal). METHOD AND MATERIALS: Forty newly extracted non-carious first permanent molars were embedded in a Teflon mold. The teeth were divided into four groups and each consisted of ten specimens. The bonding surfaces were treated with either Prompt L-Pop as recommended by the manufacturer or etched with phosphoric acid. After 24 hours of water storage, the specimens were evaluated for shear bond strength using an Instron testing machine. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) examinations were carried out to evaluate the failure sites of the sealants.

RESULTS: The mean shear bond strengths using Prompt L-Pop were Concise: 23.46 MPa and Dyract Seal: 20.34 MPa. These values were higher than and statistically different from those of Dyract Seal (9.99 MPa) and Concise (8.85 MPa) when phosphoric acid was used. The failure was predominantly of the adhesive type. The SEM examination showed the failure of debonding was predominantly related to the type of etching systems used rather than the type of fissure sealants.

CONCLUSION: The use of the all-in-one self-etching adhesive Prompt L-Pop improves the mean enamel shear bond strength of fissure sealants.


4. Al-Malik MI, Al-Sarheed MA.

Comprehensive dental care of pediatric patients treated under general anesthesia in a hospital setting in Saudi Arabia. J Contemp Dent Pract. 2006 Feb 15;7(1):79-88.

The aims of this study were to determine the characteristics of patients and type of dental treatment carried out using dental general anesthesia (DGA) during two years in a following three year period. A total of 182 patients received treatment between 1999 and 2001. The mean age was 4.9 years. The main indication for DGA was behavior management problems. Complete oral rehabilitation including complex restorative treatment and extractions was provided under DGA at a single visit. Failure to return for recalls was common; 83% of patients returned for the post-operative recall but only 26% after a three year period. Most of the patients requiring further treatment accepted it in the dental chair. Only one patient received a second DGA during the three years following treatment.


5. Al-Sarheed M.

Occupational exposures and hepatitis B vaccination statues in dental students in Central Saudi Arabia. Saudi Med J. 2004 Dec;25(12):1943-6.

OBJECTIVE:
To assess the nature of occupational exposures occurring to students and to assess the rate of reporting of incidents. METHODS: A self-administrated questionnaire was circulated to third, fourth and final year undergraduate dental students in Dental College of King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from April 2004 to May 2004. The questionnaire was consisted of 4 domains: personal details, hepatitis B vaccination, occupational exposures and reporting of the exposure incident.

RESULTS: Significantly more incidents occurred among final year students than third year students. Through the students there was no correlation between ages, gender, and dominate hand; however, more exposures occurred in female students. A significant decrease in exposures (p<0.05) occurred when an assistant was employed. Some students with one or more exposures during their training were percutaneous injuries predominated. Seventy-seven (28.9%) students stated that they have not been vaccinated against hepatitis B virus and that was notice among male students.

CONCLUSION: Dental teaching colleges are faced with the unique challenge of protecting the student and populations against blood-borne infections. Efforts must go beyond teaching of universal precaution, which should include safer products and clinical procedures that can reduce the risks associated with occupational exposures.


6. Al-Sarheed M, Bedi R, Hunt NP.

The views and attitudes of parents of children with a sensory impairment towards orthodontic care. Eur J Orthod. 2004 Feb;26(1):87-91.

A questionnaire was sent to the parents of 77 visually impaired (VI), 210 hearing impaired (HI) and 494 control children seeking their views on their child's dental appearance, orthodontic treatment need and issues that might influence the child undertaking treatment. The parents' views were compared with a dentist's assessment of treatment need using the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). There was disagreement between the dentist's assessment and the parents' perceptions in all groups. However, the least disagreement was seen in the HI group. There was a statistically significant (P < 0.05) association between control and HI parents' views of their children's treatment needs and their opinion on their dental appearance. Most parents thought that orthodontic treatment was difficult to obtain and expensive and that their child would find difficulty coping with the treatment. Furthermore, parents of VI children considered that treatment was unlikely to be undertaken due to their child's reduced concern for their appearance. The study indicates that the awareness of treatment need for VI and HI children differs between their parents and dentists.


 

7. AlSarheed M, Bedi R, Hunt NP.

Traumatised permanent teeth in 11-16-year-old Saudi Arabian children with a sensory impairment attending special schools. Dent Traumatol. 2003 Jun;19(3):123-5.

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of traumatised permanent teeth among sensory (visual (VI) and hearing (HI)) impaired children attending special schools in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All the dental injuries involved incisor teeth, and trauma was noted in 33 (6.7%) children attending government schools (control group) compared to 7 (9%) VI children and 24 (11.4%) HI children. Differences in the dental trauma only reached statistical significance between the HI and control group (P < 0.05). Gender differences were only apparent in the HI group, with males having higher levels of traumatised teeth. In addition, HI children aged 11-12 years were more prone to trauma than children in the control group of the same age (P < 0.05). In conclusion, sensory impaired children do have a tendency for more dental trauma. However, this was only statistically significant for HI children. Whereas a gender difference was most noticeable for the HI group, with males having higher levels of trauma, this was noticeable by its absence among VI children.


8. Al-Sarheed M, Bedi R, Hunt NP.

Orthodontic treatment need and self-perception of 11-16-year-old Saudi Arabian children with a sensory impairment attending special schools. J Orthod. 2003 Mar;30(1):39-44.

AIM: To determine the self-perception and need for orthodontic treatment in young sensory [visual (VI) and hearing (HI)] impaired children attending special schools in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Also, to determine if gender and social class background influence the rating and self-perception of malocclusion among the children.

LOCATION: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

DESIGN: A prospective study on orthodontic treatment need in sensory impaired children. SUBJECTS: Seventy-seven VI, 210 HI, and 494 control (C) children aged 11-16 years.

METHOD: The aesthetic component (AC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) was determined using the standard 10 pictures for the C group and HI with a modified version (tactile graphic) for VI. The dental health component (DHC) and AC of IOTN were used to allocate each child to no need, borderline need and definite need for treatment subgroups.

RESULTS: Sixty-five per cent of VI, 21.8 per cent HI, and 18.7 per cent of the C were perceived to be in need of orthodontic treatment. However, 55.8 VI, 43 per cent HI and 34 per cent C were rated for treatment need based upon the AC. The difference between the examiner and the child's rating of treatment need was found to be statistically significant among the HI and control children (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The VI children who were scored for treatment by the examiner as having need for treatment had similar perceptions of their treatment need irrespective of their social background. Male VI children had a higher DHC score, but both VI and HI males had a higher normative and self-perceived need based on AC.


9. AlSarheed M, Bedi R, Hunt N.

The development of a tactile graphic version of IOTN for visually impaired patients. Clin Orthod Res. 2000 May;3(3):94-100.

The Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) is a visual-based index and has been widely used. This paper describes the development and evaluation of tactile graphics representing the aesthetic component (AC) of IOTN for the use of visually impaired patients (VI). Four tactile graphics were produced corresponding to IOTN photographs 1 (graphic 1, no treatment - mild need), 5 (graphic 2, moderate need), 8 (graphic 3, severe need; increased overjet) and 10 (graphic 4, severe need). Nine (30-50 years) expert consumers from the Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB) and 13 VI schoolchildren (11-16 years) evaluated the graphics. The evaluation was in terms of design features, complexity of information and ease of use. Each individual was asked to arrange the graphics in order of severity of malocclusion. The procedure was repeated after 30 min to test individual reliability (http://www.clinorthodres.com/cor-c-084/). The consumer group was able to identify the main features in each graphic and found them easy to use. Six had arranged the graphics correctly at the first attempt and five on their second. The children were able to distinguish the different oral features, except the overjet presentation in graphic 2. Nine children arranged the graphics correctly at the first attempt, but only six at the second. The confusion centred for both groups on presenting an increased overjet with graphic 2. A modification was undertaken to enhance the anterior-posterior nature of the image. Fifteen VI schoolchildren reassessed the modified graphics, 14 arranged them correctly at the first attempt and 13 at the second. The study concluded that IOTN tactile graphics were well accepted and showed a good reliability.


10. AlSarheed M, Bedi R, Hunt NP.

Special Care Dentist. Attitudes of dentists, working in Riyadh, toward people with a sensory impairment.2001 May-Jun;21(3):113-6.

This study was conducted to determine the attitudes of dentists, working in Riyadh, toward people with a sensory impairment (SI), according to the Scale of Attitude Towards Disabled Persons (SADP). The SADP scale was modified to focus solely upon sensory impairment. The modified scale was pre-tested and then incorporated into a self-administered questionnaire. This was then administered to 600 dentists (response rate, 73.7%) working in the city of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The modified scale showed itself to be reliable, with a Chronbach's coefficient alpha 0.616 and four-factor analysis, which accounted for 38.5% of the variance. Ninety-four percent of the dentists were generally positive toward SI in the society. There were, however, significant variations in attitudes, with a more positive score for dentists who had worked for 30 years or more (p < 0.005), were specialists (p < 0.005), received little or no undergraduate training in this subject (p < 0.05), and who received their undergraduate training in Europe/North America (p < 0.001). However, in a stepwise regression model, all these variables were significant except for the years of practice. The modified SADP showed dentists, working in Saudi Arabia, having a positive attitude toward people with SI.


11. Al-Sarheed M, Angeletou A, Ashley PF, Lucas VS, Whitehead B, Roberts GJ. Int J Paediatr Dent. 2000 Dec;10(4):298-305.

An investigation of the oral status and reported oral care of children with heart and heart-lung transplants.

AIM: To investigate the oral health status and oral microflora of children who have received heart and heart-lung transplants. Parental knowledge and current practice of oral health procedures by the child were also investigated.

SAMPLE AND METHOD: Thirty-five children attending the Cardio-Thoracic Transplant Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children were included. Measurements were compared with children matched by age and gender attending the trauma clinic at the Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Eastman Dental Hospital. Teeth were examined for the presence or absence of caries or enamel defects. Plaque deposition, gingivitis, gingival bleeding and gingival enlargement were measured and a swab was taken to look at the oral microbial flora. A questionnaire was used to assess parental knowledge of dental health procedures and the current practice of these.

RESULTS: There were no significant differences between transplant and control children in caries experience, plaque or gingivitis. Children with heart or heart-lung transplants had significantly greater numbers of enamel defects and more gingival enlargement than control children, children in the heart transplant group had significantly more gingival bleeding. There was little difference in the dental knowledge and reported behaviour of the transplant group compared to the control group.

CONCLUSION: The dental needs of heart and heart-lung transplant patients treated at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children were similar to those of the control group in this study, however further improvement could be made in educating parents and children on the importance of caries prevention and good oral hygiene.


12. Nicholson JW, Alsarheed M.

Changes on storage of polyacid-modified composite resins. J Oral Rehabil. 1998 Aug;25(8):616-20.

Two polyacid-modified composite resins, Dyract and Compoglass, have been studied for water-uptake on storage in three aqueous media, namely pure water, 0.9% NaCl and 1 M NaCl at 37 degrees C, and the results compared with those of a conventional composite resin, Pekafill. The equilibrium water-uptake of Dyract and Compoglass varied depending on time of cure and ionic strength of the storage medium. This latter finding contrasted with that for Pekafill, where equilibrium water content showed almost no variation with ionic strength of the storage medium. Uptake of water was always greater in Dyract and Compoglass than in Pekafill, reflecting the role of water in promoting the later neutralization reaction in these materials and its further role in hydrating the ionic products of that reaction. Despite this and other evidence of neutralization, specimens of Dyract and Compoglass stored in wet conditions (0.9% NaCl) showed no change in compressive strength on storage from 24 h to 30 days, a result similar to that reported previously for Dyract alone for flexural strength for times up to 1 year. By contrast, specimens of Dyract and Compoglass stored in dry air at 37 degrees C, and therefore unable to undergo any neutralization, showed an increase in compressive strength of between 40 and 70 MPa by 30 days that was significant at P < 0.01.


13. Feeding habits of children with Down syndrome living in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Maha Al-Sarheed
Consultant Pedodontist, Assistant Professor, Division of Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Preventive Dental Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Abstract
Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the duration of breastfeeding and the timing of introduction of solid food among children with Down syndrome living in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Subjects and Method: Mothers of 225 children attending three institutes providing education for children with Down syndrome were asked to complete a questionnaire. Data were collected on knowledge of feeding procedures, pattern of feeding, and the introduction of solid food. Results: Although 66.7% of mothers breastfed initially, 30% of them discontinued breastfeeding at 3–6 months of the child’s age. Overall, mothers of children with Down syndrome introduced solid food to their children between 6–9 months of age and the most frequently used formula was Similac “yellow”. Just over 15% of the mothers gave their children sweet food every day as part of weaning. Most mothers believe that chocolate is bad for their children teeth. Conclusion: In Saudi Arabia, mothers with Down syndrome children are more likely to breastfeed. The introduction of solid food was relatively late.

Other Abstracts